Realty Executives

Singing in the Brain

by Susan Christy 06/30/2019

Remember how the tunes and lyrics from those Disney movies or musicals stick with you. Then, you find yourself suddenly belting one out as you drive home from work on Friday afternoon. The sheer joy of singing, even if you can’t carry a tune, just makes you feel good. But is it only the musical memories it evokes or is there more to it.

Researchers believe there’s more.

Much more.How singing helps your brain

- When you sing, it releases endorphins (those chemicals that make you feel-good) into the brain.

- It can lift mild depression.

- Learning the lyrics to songs improves your memory.

- Singing boosts your immune system, helping you resist illnesses.

- A song in your heart releases stress.

- The deep breathing, while you sing, clears your thinking.

- Vocalizing benefits your heart.

- While singing, your energy level increases.

When you sing correctly, that is, when you breathe deeply from your belly as you sing, you fill your lungs with oxygen which pushes more oxygen into your brain. In turn, that extra oxygen gives your mind the extra energy boost. The exercise provides your entire cardiovascular system a workout.

But singing does more than improve oxygen levels. Its vibrations change your brain itself by altering your brainwaves. And the endorphins it releases floods your mind with delight.

Researchers have studies on group singing such as in a choir or glee club revealing that singers have lower cortisol levels, meaning they have lower stress levels. Lower daytime cortisol levels give you a better night’s sleep too so singing can help you be more rested. Singing keeps you younger also. It gives your body and your brain a good workout and exercises your facial and neck muscles.

Children benefit from singing too. Lullabies, rhymes, and chants carry the rhythm of their culture. It prepares them for hearing and forming words, and developing language. Their speech improves when they learn to sing new words. And as they sing with you, it promotes social bonding.

If you’ve recently moved to a new city, finding a choral group, musical theater, or even the karaoke night at your local pub can give you an opportunity to exercise your voice, improve your brain, and also make new friends. Check with your local library or speak to the music teacher at your children’s school for information on vocal opportunities near you.

About the Author
Author

Susan Christy

 Hello, and thank you for visiting!

When it comes to real estate experience, few compare to Susan Christy. As a full-time Realtor for over 30 years, Susan has been successfully selling and finding homes for her clients since 1987, and her in-depth knowledge of the real estate process is hard to match. There are few challenges Susan hasn’t experienced and successfully resolved. She has not only the expertise to seamlessly close a real estate transaction, but the personal skills to instill a comfortable confidence, putting her clients at ease. She carefully listens, puts a plan in place, and follows through to the close of escrow and beyond. Susan is the real estate professional with the tact and skill to negotiate the highest return for her sellers and best possible price for her buyers: the true professional you want on your side.